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Catch of the Day- Mega Lobster & Rum

Today we went offshore to spear fish with our friends aboard Sandpiper.  They go offshore to spear pretty much all the time for food, and have a Hawaiian sling (a type of spear)  that we could try out.  We found some coral and got into the water.  Sandpiper got some fish right away. Grant saw a huge lobster in a hole but it was successful in hiding far enough in that we couldn’t get him!

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Then, just as we were about to leave, Mark from Sandpiper came back with a fish and said he had spotted another lobster.  Grant went over to the spot and speared a medium-sized lobster.  Amelia spotted a mega-lobster and Mark speared it.  It is the biggest lobster we have seen!

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Our friends on Sandpiper put a lot of time into spearfishing and it really shows!  They usually get snapper for dinner and will fillet Lion Fish too.  They shared a Lion fish fillet with us and it was really good!

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Because we only caught a medium sized lobster, we baked it for an appetizer and then made burritos with some chorizo from the store.  Amelia made handmade tortillas because the store didn’t have any.  She used 4 cups all-purpose flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons lard (substituted butter), 1 1/2 cups water.  Mix all together and then lightly fry on a skillet.

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The chorizo, can of black beans, onions and green pepper was heated up in the same pan after the tortillas were made.  (The tortillas took a long time, rolling them out and heating them.)

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And to finish the meal we added fresh cantaloupe slices, still chilled from the store!   Fresh produce is still a luxury.

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Sunday night was Oscars night—our chance to reconnect with American celebrity culture.  Another cruising boat put on a voting contest at Chat and Chill, the bar on Volleyball Beach.  Amelia spent hours researching websites and blogs to create her “winning list” because with all the business of cruising we haven’t seen or heard of most of these movies.  She entered her picks into the contest’s computer (all very sophisticated) and won the grand prize, a bottle of Pusser’s Rum, by a landslide.  Amelia would like to thank the NYT and Washington Post websites for their advice.

-We continue to relax here in Georgetown for a while, having fun with the regatta and scheming about what we will do for hurricane season.

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Reaching Georgetown- A Cruiser’s Mecca

There are about 250 cruising boats here.  It is considered a low year.  Past years the count was 500 boats.  People have said this is because not many Americans are here due to the economy.

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We woke up at dawn, listened to the weather on our SSB (single side band)  receiver and then headed 38 miles south to Georgetown from Little Farmer’s Cay. We began sailing under genoa and main sail.  By afternoon we were passed by some Norwegian friends on Adela, so we rose the spinnaker but still couldn’t catch them!  A cold front was closing in behind us, and as we entered the harbor the sea went still, so we motored into the anchorage by Monument Hill just as the front brought gusts of wind from the north.P2220185

The next morning we introduced ourselves on the Cruiser’s Net, a hour-long VHF program of weather and announcements.  We plan to do some more socializing and have already met a few people to hang out with.P2220202

Volleyball Beach, the cruiser’s headquarters, is owned by the restaurant/bar Chat and Chill.  They do not allow you to bring food or drink onto the property anymore, but otherwise the cruiser’s seem to still have a separate clearing in the trees where they can play volleyball, do yoga and read books.P2210178

Across the harbor is the entrance to town.  Through the bridge is the dinghy dock- connected to free water, the grocery store (Exuma Markets) and a wonderful library with the best selection we have seen in the Bahamas!  It is nice to have this convenience all around us again.  We look forward to spending a month here relaxing, visiting with family and participating in the the Cruising Regatta!

Catch of the Day- Mahi Mahi!

The weather has really calmed down (finally!) so we decided to make our way south to Farmers Cay on the Ocean side, taking the opportunity to do some fishing.  We went into the town of Black Point and optimistically bought a bag of ice in case we caught fish (a deal at $3) and stopped by the grocery store one last time to find lettuce and some local tomatoes (also reasonably priced).  Produce!!!  So far so good!

We motored out the cut with some heavy current and made our course along the 80 foot ledge, that drops to about 150 feet—beyond that our depth sounder couldn’t tell us.  It was a nice calm day out.  As soon as we got out Amelia saw some fish activity in the water, we motored over but no luck.  Grant had two reels and a hand line out. A little while later he saw some activity in the water, we went over and a Mahi Mahi picked our nice reel that we had put 150 feet back!!!!!!

Catching Mahi Mahi by Velocir

Compared to a Barracuda he didn’t put up much of a fight.  They are smart and he actually tried to swim towards and under the boat to escape.  Unfortunately that made him easier to reel in and Amelia just moved the tiller to make Velocir move every time he tried to swim under the hull.

Catching Mahi Mahi by Velocir

As soon as Mahi Mahi are caught, they turn from a brillant Green-Blue coloring to yellow, to green and finally grey.  It is very sad and beautiful!

Coming in the cut at Farmer’s Cay, we anchored next to a little sandy bay.  We went into town quickly before dark to see if there was any produce.  Nothing and no boat for at least a week.  We stopped by the local bar.   Everyone was watching Whitney Houston’s “private” funeral on CNN.  That is when we realized we have not seen or checked the news since we left Florida.  Even when we have internet we have not even thought to look.  As a news junkie, this was a big realization for Amelia.  We are changing little by little.  Life is slowing down.Catching Mahi Mahi by Velocir

We thanked the fish a lot for being our dinner, and then baked him up with a seasoning Amelia’s mom made us.  It’s a combination of paprika/garlic powder/black pepper/onion powder/oregano/thyme and cayenne pepper and is especially good on swordfish.  Amelia also made Homemade Potato Salad, (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/worlds-best-potato-salad/) which was delicious.  Making it from scratch really forces you realize how unhealthy it is!!  Better than baked potatoes on a hot day though.  With the ice we bought, we’ll even be able to have cool potato salad tomorrow!!!  Cold food is a novelty.

Thunderball, Pigs, Iguanas- much to do!

The winds at Pipe Cay subsiding, we sailed for Staniel Cay and anchored at Big Major Cay which is home to Pig Beach.  “Wild” pigs actively live on the island, and their favorite hang out spot is this beach.  (This is likely because tourists go over and feed them multiple times a day.)  Amelia was excited there were five piglets— super cute!  We motored over in the dinghy to see them up-close.

Pig Beach by Velocir

We didn’t have any food for them, so when one started swimming toward the boat Amelia wanted to keep our distance.  Thoughts of the pigs jumping into/capsizing the dinghy and getting bitten flashed through her mind.  Grant thought it was funny how nervous Amelia was about the pigs near our dinghy.  When we got back to Velocir other cruisers went over to feed the pigs.  Amelia’s fear of them jumping into the dinghy was not unfounded!

Staniel Cay Yacht Club by Velocir

The next day we walked around Staniel Cay, a quiet town.  Instead of paying $5 at the marina, we walked 10 minutes to the dump to get rid of our trash.  Then we treated ourselves to lunch at Staniel Cay Yacht Club.  It was the most popular place in town, festively decorated with flags and swarming with cruisers (as well as people from private planes who fly down for the day from Florida).  The food was really yummy (we had a Club sandwich and fish burger with onion rings)  The waitress even gave us free Pina Colodas because she was practicing for the bar!

Walking around town later in the afternoon, we went in search of fresh produce.  None of the islands we have visited have had a produce boat in weeks, which we are told is strange.  We walked up to the first store we came by and workers were moving in boxes of fresh produce, just arrived by plane!  We thought we’d lucked out, as we were among the first to arrive.  The prices even seemed reasonable.  We picked some things out and went over to the counter.  Waiting, we heard the cashier tell the couple in front of us that the prices would be more than marked, because it was flown in.  The couple said, oh yes, we had thought as much, it doesn’t matter to us (we have heard this “rich” attitude ruins it for other cruisers).  When it was our turn Amelia said, how much is this bag of celery?  We don’t even like celery that much, but it is usually cheap and keeps well.  It was $5!  If celery was $5 ($1.50 on the tag) we could not afford any of the other food we had gathered up.  Grant put it all back while Amelia purchased some eggs and a small bag of carrots.  Looking back, our lunch was pretty cheap in comparison!

Thunderball Cave by Velocir

The next day was very busy.  We got up early at low tide to snorkel Thunderball Cave, made famous in an older James Bond film.  It was very beautiful and fish followed us around everywhere we went.  To enter the cave, we swam under a shallow ledge.  At high tide, this ledge is submerged and you actually have to dive down and then up into the cave.  It was early in the day, so the sunlight wasn’t shining directly in through the holes above the cave, but we could still see some beautiful coral and fish!

Thunderball Cave by Velocir

Some of the best coral was outside the cave!

Sailing Velocir

We waited until high tide and then took the shallow route south to Bitter Guana Cay, home to endangered Iguanas.  They are said to live up to 80 years old and are one of the most endangered Iguana species in the world.

Bitter Guana Cay by Velocir

Their home was on a strip of beach with white cliffs towering overhead.  We anchored right off the beach and went to visit the Iguanas.

Bitter Guana Cay by Velocir

There were a lot of them!  They had interesting reddish coloring, and some were as large as a cat.  The way their skin hung off their bodies, their limbs looked like stuffed beanie toys.

Bitter Guana Cay by Velocir

Their tail-streaks lined the beach.

Black Point by Velocir

Our anchorage by the Iguanas was a bit rolly, so we went farther south to Black Point a small “local” town, crowded with cruisers.  It had a small grocery store (no fresh produce), a cute cafe and a very nice laundrymat (a little pricy but popular).  It was the weekend, and a lot of local men were coming to the town pier by boat with their fresh lobster tails.  They started a fire and grilled them on the rocks.

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We went back to Velocir and ate some more canned food for dinner, enjoying a beautiful sunset!

Tucked in for a Norther at Pipe Cay

The weather was calling for a pretty bad Norther and squalls.  Winds 20-25 knots from the NW and N.  Accounting for swell, and swell wrapping around islands, the most protected spot we could find on the chart was Pipe Creek/Cay.  We motored 20 miles to seek shelter here.  It is an interesting Cay covered with sand bars.  As we entered our anchorage we found one other boat there— a couple we met in Beaufort, NC!  It has actually been really hard for us to meet people so it was fun to see a friendly face.

Pipe Cay by Velocir

We had trouble finding a spot among the sandbars and scoured channels.   We didn’t get a good hold on our anchor (something we don’t experience a lot) and found limited space.  We nestled up to a sandy spot with good holding, putting out two anchors so that we didn’t swing into a shallow bump at low tide.  Grant swam all around the boat to see what the bottom was like.  A low tide he was standing next to Velocir!!

That night the NW winds started to fill in and unfortunately we were still getting swell wrapping around to our SW anchorage entrance!  It was a rolly night with no sleep to be had.  That morning at high tide a man from a nearby private island (everywhere are private islands with a fancy houses) offered us his empty mooring in a more protected spot.  We were extremely thankful and took the offer.  It was like night and day.  Super protected from the weather we took some naps.  Many thanks for the mooring, however, if the protected channel had not been full of moorings we would have anchored there to begin with!

Pipe Cay by Velocir Albin Vega

Velocir in her little channel protected from the swell.  We went on a walk of the sandbars.  When we got back, Velocir had edged herself sideways in the channel and was aground!  Only a little bit though, within an hour we were back afloat and tightened up on the mooring to give us less swing room and it wasn’t  a problem again.

Conch by Velocir

The sandbars had the most vibrant and beautiful conch we had ever seen!  It’s like there are different “conch family” species in each area that carry distinct colors and traits.  These were the most spindly and had the most vibrant pinks and oranges we have seen.

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Huge creepy sand crab carcass!!Pipe Cay by Velocir

We hiked westward on Pipe Cay to an abandoned DECCA station noted on the chart.  It has a huge cement pier with bollards, a cement boat ramp, a large cistern and several buildings.  It had been abandoned for at least 20 years based on the graffiti.

Pipe Cay by Velocir

As we approached the larger abandoned building we were startled quite a bit by this propane-man watching TV at his table.  When you are traipsing around abandoned buildings alone, catching a glimpse of someone out of the corner of your eye, even a fake person at a table is quite frightening.

Pipe Cay by Velocir

Inside the building was demolished.  We headed back to the boat and waited out the heavy winds for three days.  We each read three books! We also did some organizing, cleaning, installed a new fan and serviced the genoa winches. Amelia even made pumpkin pie when it got cold to heat up the boat.

Starfish by Velocir

The winds began to moderate but the weather was still very cold.  While Grant was doing dishes in the cockpit he accidentally threw Amelia’s favorite knife overboard in a bucket of dirty dishwater.  He jumped in to retrieve it and found the water was warm, so he went hunting for conch.

Pipe Cay by Velocir

Grant didn’t find any conch but he did see some sea turtles and coral so Amelia went snorkeling too and saw two sea turtles!!!!  Then, we heated some water up on the stove, mixed it into our sunshower water and were warm again!

Pipe Cay Sunset by Velocir

Angry weather brings beautiful sunsets.  We look forward to exploring Pipe Cay more as the weather improves.

Northern Land and Sea Park- Shroud Cay

Before we left Norman’s Cay and entered the legally protected waters of the Land and Sea Park, Grant tested his luck at spearfishing fish for the first time (not lobsties).  Amelia watched from the dinghy as Grant swam around some coral heads he had found near the cut.  He was going to practice his skills on slow lionfish that are an invasive species people are encouraged to spear.

As Grant looked around the coral for lionfish he came across a black grouper trapped between him and the coral.  Without hesitation he speared it his first try!  We had expected to spend at least an hour practicing on using the spear for fish.  Instead, Grant had dinner in five minutes!

The next day we motored with a light unfavorable breeze to Shroud Cay, one of the northernmost islands of the Exumas Land and Sea Park.  Shroud is known for its mangrove canals that run across the island.  The Park allows boaters to traverse the northernmost canal.  It was a fun ride through the island with a bit of heavy current.  As we began the current was against us, then it switched and we turned off the engine to for a slow ride.  The current started to pick up quite a bit and swirled us out into a sandy beach.Shroud Cay by Velocir

It was soft silky sand.  We walked along and onto the sandbars exploring.

Shroud Cay by Velocir

When we returned to Velocir the wind had shifted and we moved to a more protected anchorage for the night.  (Finding an anchorage protected from swell in the Exumas has proven to be a challenge.  Even with an East wind West swell seems to emerge.)  The anchorage was part of the Park’s mooring field.  There were a few boats anchored but only one on a mooring.  We hiked up the path of the anchorage’s small beach to an old well Grant found referenced in a vintage cruising book we brought.  It said the well was used for fresh water for boaters (we took a little for showers).

Shroud Cay by Velocir

A short blog with not as many adventures.  We are relaxing a little and taking long walks on the beach, followed by good books in the evenings.

Cruising’s Holy Land–the Exumas

We left Rock Sound with the sunrise, making a good sail southward to Highborne Cay in the Exumas.  The crossing was about 60 miles through protected Eleuthera sandbanks and out into the unprotected Exuma Sound.  Just as we crossed through the last part of Eleuthera we caught a pretty good-sized fish!  As Grant reeled it in a small shark started to attack it.  Luckily it just cut its tail and we didn’t lose it.  We made some yummy fish tacos for lunch the next day.

Fish Tacos by Velocir

Our decision not to take our sea-sickness medicine, Stugeron was a bad one.  Amelia felt the worst she has the entire trip, even so much as to reference a voyage she experienced years ago where she was so sick for 9 days she vowed never to set foot on that particular sailboat ever again.  She spent most of her time on the floor of Velocir waiting for the voyage to be over.

Luckily it was a fast transit with our spinnaker up.  We made it into Highborne Cay with plenty of daylight and anchored among quite a large fleet of mega yachts and cruisers.

Mega Yacht Slide by Velocir

If your mega-yacht is high enough, at least four stories, you can attach a huge slide to it and trail four jet skis behind!  We are not used to being around so many other boats after our secluded weeks in Eleuthera.

We have to admit that we are a little wary of the Exumas.   We know it is that sought after paradise of cruiser’s lore.  The place to be.  But it seems this is a resort and marina based island chain catering to the wealthy mega-yacht elite.  If the island is not private it is owned by a resort and marina.  After being spoiled in the secure friendly harbors of Eleuthera, the popular Exumas Land and Sea Park which covers a large area has filled their anchorages with moorings they charge you for.  To sum up—the Exumas is not for the poor.  It is extremely crowded with cruisers and there is a charge for everything.  Despite this, I think we are still going to love it here and in the end not spend very much at all because we provisioned so well in Florida.

Sailing Velocir Albin Vega

We sailed for Norman’s Cay the next day to find a more protected anchorage.  This island is popular because it has the remains of an airplane that crashed into its sandy shores during the 70s when the island was used for drug smuggling.

Our first day here was one of the most beautiful and relaxing we have had.  We roamed the beaches, snorkeled the sunken plane, hunted for conch, watched a huge beautiful ray gracefully inspect our empty conch shells, ate conch fritters and watched an impressive fireworks display and a glowing full moon.  It was Disney magical.  Perhaps there is some truth to the lure of the Exumas.Normans Cay by Velocir

Shades of blue and green water in the shallows of Norman’s Cay.

Normans Cay by Velocir

Huge conch bed opposite our anchorage.  The best we have seen!Sailing by Velocir Albin Vega

A halo around the sun adding even more beauty to our tranquil setting.  We hope to explore the Land and Sea Park in the coming days and see even more sea life!

Unhappy Barracuda, Laundry and Water

The weather has been very very windy.  It seems like the wind hasn’t calmed down for weeks.  We had a favorable breeze so we sailed from Hatchet Bay to Governors Harbour.  It was a wet and windy sail, but we made it in a few hours.  Governors Harbour is an old city that was once intended to be the capital of the Bahamas.  There are a few beautiful old churches and a nice government building right along the water.

The government building is home to a monument/spicket with a plaque commemorating the city water of Governors Harbour.  Free city water!  We took our collapsible water jugs and hose to fill up our water tanks.

Velocir holds about 80 gallons of water.  We have the original 30 gallon plastic Albin Vega water tank forward under the v-berth.  Then, just aft of this we put a soft plastimo water tank.  It is 40 gallons but with the limited space of that compartment we estimate having filled it about 30 gallons.  Our third water tank is a plastic 20 gallon tank located in our starboard cockpit section, giving it easy connection to the sink just feet away.  The two forward tanks are separated but also joined by a Y valve.  One hose is run aft to the sink to another Y valve that joins the cockpit tank.  This way if one tank becomes contaminated, springs a leak or has a problem we won’t loose all our water, just one tank.

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After filling our tanks in four runs, we had extra water for doing laundry.  Amelia used our bucket for washing and a collapsible plastic basin for rinsing.  Then, everything was hung up with clothespins to dry.  There was a lot of laundry in the pile!

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The next day another sailboat came into the harbor—the Schooner Liberty Clipper from Boston.  On our way out of the harbor headed for Rock Sound, we motored by and said hello.  We had some friends in common and it was nice to see another tallship again!

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The sail to Rock Sound was much calmer….it could even be described as relaxing and fun!!!  Grant caught a mackerel and a barracuda and Amelia caught a big barracuda!  Coming into Rock Sound its namesake became clear—there were quite a few rocks underwater (but clearly marked on our chart).

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After we anchored in Rock Sound the wind picked up again.  We settled into the boat down below playing card games, cribbage, reading books and making homemade bread.  (The price per loaf has exceeded Amelia’s max of $3.50 a loaf she is willing to pay).  Favorite bread making recipe site is, coincidentally, called:  www.cookingbread.com and their joint blog www.thekneadforbread.com.  All photos are amazing and I chose the Farmers Bread recipe, substituting maple syrup for molasses.  Very good!

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The next night we did something out of the ordinary.  We went on a date!!!  It was nice to have a special evening, watching the sunset together overlooking the water.  Grant picked the restaurant and it was great.  We were the only patrons there and ate conch quesadillas and shrimp pizza—yum!

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We came back to Velocir just before another squall went through.  The weather will improve tomorrow according to predictions and we will sail onward to the Exumas!

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