Advertisements
Archives

project

This tag is associated with 2 posts

I’m On A Boat–Interior Paint Preparation

Let’s go back in time, to when Velocir was completely stripped down to a bare hull.  Yes, that glorious moment when the interior was saying “paint me, I have no wood in me and am already a filthy dust pile!”  But no one heard the calls.

Fast forward to cruising Velocir and the paint is porous, crumbly and very susceptible to mold.  If only we had realized!!  Of course, that would have made things easy….

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

There are two reasons why the interior desperately needs to be painted—mold and flaking paint.  Why is this happening—this is caused mostly by A) porous old paint on a bumpy fiberglass surface B) a gel-coat like filler was used along the outer 1-2 inches of the hull right where the deck meets the hull.  This filler has flex cracks, or in some cases just crumbly texture, causing a mold habitat.  As the cracks held moisture the paint started to flake and fall off.  The paint is not adhering to the filler at all anymore.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

To solve this problem Amelia is going to tackle this pain of a project.  It is a pain because A) you have to be a gymnast to work upside down in these cramped conditions B) it is messy, mess everywhere all over our home C) the wood paneling limits access to the far reaches of some areas and gives little to no clearance to paint between wood bulkheads and the fiberglass.  It is a delicate process to do the job well, without focusing on all the imperfections that will inevitably happen.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

Beginning with the nice vision of a fresh, bright and clean Velocir in mind, Amelia first took out any hardware that needed to be removed for sanding and duct taped a plastic sheet to keep dust out of the main cabin.  Then, using a rotary sander with 80 grit and a little “mouse” sander with 120 grit, she sanded the surfaces thoroughly.  Around the edges of the hull where the paint was flaking, she used a chisel, and then hand sanded the surface.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

About halfway into the project Amelia started to regret the undertaking.  Dust everywhere, sanding in corners, upside down, around windows and other obstacles.  Her arms started to feel weak from pushing the sander against the hull.  What a mess the boat was!  But it was too late to turn back now.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

The interior was now sanded and smooth, but very dusty.  Amelia used a shop vac to get most of the grime off every surface.  Then, she used diluted bleach water and wiped down every surface.  Some mold still hid in sanded areas, so this really cleaned things up!

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

The duct taped plastic shield worked great!  It didn’t stick to the varnished wood or leave any residue.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

On outer edges of the hull, an epoxy-like filler was used.  This is where the flex cracks happened.  Using a dremel, Amelia gouged out the cracks until they were smooth.  There were also crumbly areas that were cleaned out.  Most cracks were superficial, but two (by the water tank input, and by the starboard lifeline stanchion) were 1/8” deep.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

To fill these cracks we needed something that a latex based paint would adhere to.  It also could not be too rigid or else it would crack again.  Our solution was g-flex, a flexible epoxy that we used to repair our inflatable dinghy’s oar locks in the Bahamas with great success.  It is easy to mix the 1:1 solution and apply.  The application was very simple because it did not want to move around, even when applying upside down.  At times (probably because it was so cold) it got stringy but was manageable.

Albin Vega Velocir Interior Paint Preparation

Once the epoxy cures it will be sanded, wiped down with acetone and the entire forward interior will be ready to paint.  First we will use a primer, then glossy paint.  Hopefully the weather will warm up for that project soon!

Advertisements

I’m On A Boat- New Video Series

Just this last month we’ve started a new video series called “I’m On A Boat.”

It will cover all sailing projects and endeavors apart from our cruising on Velocir.  Here are the first three installments about a Camper Nicholson 31 owner fixing fiberglass, gelcoat blisters and running rigging.

Hope you enjoy!  And if you haven’t watched our other series “A Day in the Life: Cruising Albin Vega Velocir” you can watch at www.youtube.com/svvelocir

A guide to repair and fixing fiberglass blisters on boats. This is a common problem among sailboat hulls produced in the mid-seventies. Narrated by a Camper Nicholson 31 owner completing this project himself by prepping and filling his blisters with epoxy resin. An informative how-to on this topic with demonstration and step-by-step instruction.
Redoing the running rigging on a cruising sailboat involves measuring, measuring and measuring. Then we head over to Bacon Sails and Marine Supplies for a tutorial of the different standard line selections, discussing their uses, breaking strengths and design qualities. After we’ve made our selection, the handy line counter does its job and we have our new running rigging. http://www.velocir.com http://www.baconsails.com
Camper Nicholson 31 owner repairs cracks and crazing in the gelcoat on the hull. This is caused by impact to the hull, manufacturer error in too thick gelcoat and bending around forward bulkheads. He uses a rotary tool to grind the crack down to the fiberglass, then he fills it with and Interlux epoxy filler called InterProtect Watertite, uses a longboard sander to sand and then it is ready for painting. http://www.velocir.com
Advertisements

Watch Our Youtube Videos

Calendar

December 2017
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Archives

Categories